El Pintor — “Painting” another success for Interpol

Chelsea Santos, Staff Writer

On Sept. 9, New York-based rock band Interpol released their fifth studio album, El Pintor, which not only is Spanish for “the painter,” but is also an anagram of the band’s name. (That’s cool on so many levels.)

I first heard their lead track/single “All The Rage Back Home” about a month ago, while I was scrolling through the depths of YouTube’s never-ending indie rock playlists. Nothing really grabbed my attention until I heard the opening notes of this song, and I immediately downloaded it onto my computer, iPod, iPhone and anything else that could play music. And like with every song I fall in love with, I put it on repeat until my ears metaphorically bled.

And now that the physical copy of El Pintor is in my possession, I can give “All The Rage Back Home” a well-deserved break. But as I play the album for the umpteenth time, I have come to a conclusion: the songs will sound the same after seven hours of nonstop listening.

However, through much scrutiny and several pairs of earphones, I can also conclude that their lyrics do not disappoint. They’re meaningful, on different levels of perception.

However, through much scrutiny and several pairs of earphones, I can also conclude that their lyrics do not disappoint. They’re meaningful, on different levels of perception.”

— Chelsea Santos

In “The Depths,” frontman Paul Banks sings, “All I can see before me is the darkest blues/ Because I slip to the depths without you.” That’s deep… no pun intended. He obviously misses someone deeply, and without that person he will sink. (Or this song could be about drugs, depending on how you look at it.)

In “Breaker 1,” the song starts off with, “Come back, come back, I’m the warning/ Come back, come back, breaker one,” and later follows with “Babe this week I just/ Went through so much/ And went through so much darling.” I think he’s calling his lover back after he probably screwed up and she left him. But breaker (1) is slang on a CB, or citizens band, radio, means you would like to politely interrupt and speak on the channel, according to which numbers you say. Using “breaker 1” suggests that maybe the girl this song about is in a relationship, and he wants to politely interrupt that relationship so that she can come back to him. Mind = blown. But that’s just my interpretation.

Once you get through the heavy guitar riffs, you come to find that this band has obviously gone through a lot of heartbreak, deep thinking and existential crises. Bottom line: I’ll be adding Interpol to my playlists of songs to listen to while I procrastinate my entire life.