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The temporary immigration halt is a necessity

A+protester+holding+a+sign+against+Trump%27s+executive+order.
A protester holding a sign against Trump's executive order.

A protester holding a sign against Trump's executive order.

"No Ban - No Wall - No Raids" by Eric Purcell is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.

"No Ban - No Wall - No Raids" by Eric Purcell is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.

A protester holding a sign against Trump's executive order.

Henry Reed, Photo Editor

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Massive protests surged around the nation in airports and in front of the White House when the President signed an executive order that temporarily blocked travel from seven nations — Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Somalia, Sudan and Libya — and indefinitely disavowed Syrian refugee entrance to the United States. Protesters held up signs that read, “We are all immigrants in America” and other such safe space propaganda, completely ignoring the fact that these seven countries were noted by the Department of Homeland Security to be sources of terrorism.

The protests are exaggerated, misinformed reactions to a necessary order to keep United States citizens safe from the terrorist attacks, people who support these attacks and people deeply rooted in violent ideologies towards women, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those of different religious views.

The seven nations are identified in the executive order by reference to the Obama Administration’s restrictions on the Visa Waiver Program. Even before the Trump Administration, former President Barrack Obama realized that these nations are threats to the American public and ordered the Department of Homeland Security to evaluate the countries. The Department then determined that restrictions upon the seven nations are necessary, stating in its press release that the restrictions were the “latest step” to “strengthen the security” against “the growing threat from foreign terrorist fighters.”

The hostility of these countries is self-evident even without the evaluation from the defense agency of the United States. The terroristic state of Iran, one of the nations whose citizens are temporarily barred from traveling to the United States, launched two test missiles as a threat to Israel, with one of the missiles having the text “Israel must be wiped out” written on it.

This is not the first time Iran has threatened Israel, one of the most important United States allies in the Middle East. In the Iraq-Iran War anniversary parade conducted by Iran, military vehicles with the text “turn Tel Aviv and Haifa to dust” were driven amongst the various missiles and tanks. The military chief of staff, Mohammad Hossein Bagheri, called the care package the United States sent to Israel a “criminal move,” saying that this makes Iran “more determined to increase [its] military power.”

Iran has a history of violence against certain categories of people, which is the case with every country referenced in the executive order. Not only do Iran and its military members threaten other countries, the nation also regularly executes gay men and persons of a different religion than Islam, as does Somalia, Yemen and Sudan. In Iraq, young girls have their genitalia mutilated by their mothers “in the name of Allah!” using razor blades. A staggering 21 percent of Syrians support ISIS, the terrorist group responsible for burning alive foreign soldiers, committing multiple beheadings, running slave rings and imposing Sharia law upon captured territory.

The executive order states that the vetting process needs to be revised in order to be able to “determine the information needed from any country” to find out whether a person entering the United States is “who the individual claims to be and is not a security or public-safety threat.” This, obviously, is not an easy task and will require a larger focus from the Department, without the distractions of screening migrants from hostile, violent nations; therefore, the president temporarily suspended the entry of persons from the seven hostile nations outlined by the Department of Homeland Security in order to alleviate the pressures put upon the individuals responsible for revising the screening process. Because ISIS members posing as Syrian refugees with valid Syrian documents have previously committed terrorist attacks against Europe, the executive order halted the acceptance of Syrian refugees indefinitely.

Is this a ban on Muslims? No, of course not. According to a nonpartisan report by Pew Research Center, the temporary immigration ban does not affect most Muslims, as only 12 percent of Muslims reside in the countries temporarily barred. In fact, the top five countries with the largest Muslim population are not affected.

The executive order is a temporary restriction on travel for seven countries and a permanent ban on refugees proven to be sources of successful terror attacks. The people holding up their safespace signs are only fooling themselves. While the protesters may think the people from these seven countries are peaceful and harmless immigrants, in reality they have proven to be the exact opposite.

The execution of gays and non-Muslims, the inhuman treatment of women, the support of terrorist organizations and the threats towards other nations are not peaceful acts, they’re violent and inhumane. The least the United States can do is institute a temporary restriction.

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The temporary immigration halt is a necessity