Armenians take a stand

Glendale+High+School%E2%80%99s+Armenian+Club+performed+a+tabolo%E2%80%94+a+frozen+picture+to+help+the+remembrance+of+the+Armenian+Genocide.+About+one+thousand+people+were+present+for+the+14th+annual+Armenian+Genocide+Commemoration.+

Dianna Khudoyan

Glendale High School’s Armenian Club performed a tabolo— a frozen picture to help the remembrance of the Armenian Genocide. About one thousand people were present for the 14th annual Armenian Genocide Commemoration.

Dianna Khudoyan, Staff Writer/ Photographer

“I think the [Armenian Genocide] Commemoration is important because it brings the whole community together,” said Gyulnara Grigorian, President of GHS Armenian Club, of the Annual Genocide Commemoration held at Glendale High School’s John Wayne Performing Center held April 21.

“I got introduced to all the other school’s students involved in this,” she said. “It’s also important because it helps close the wounds of all the people who have been affected by the genocide.”

Nearly 1,000 Armenians and supporters from the area gathered to bring awareness to the Armenian Genocide and remember the lives lost in 1915.

Special guest speakers included Superintendent Dr. Richard Sheehan and Student Board Member Mary Agajanian. Aram Manjikian, Crescenta Valley’s Armenian Club President, said, “This event helps unify our community and gives us a chance to stage our rebirth.”

All four of the Armenian Club Presidents from Clark, Hoover, Crescenta and Glendale High Schools gave speeches to start off the commemoration. Tina Keshishian, president of Clark’s Armenian Club, served as all the voices of the students from Clark wanting to help spread awareness.

The night went on with a series of dance and musical performances from elementary, middle and high schools in the Glendale Unified School District. Choirs from Wilson Middle School, R.D. White Elementary School , Jefferson Elementary School, Davidian and Mariamian School, and Glendale High School performed traditional Armenian songs like “Erebouni” and “Arax.”

Image Dance group performed two original Armenian folk dances for this year’s annual commemoration. Dance is an art with a lot of cultural background that will help the remembrance of the Armenian Genocide.
Dianna Khudoyan
Image Dance group performed two original Armenian folk dances for this year’s annual commemoration. Dance is an art with a lot of cultural background that will help the remembrance of the Armenian Genocide.

These performances took place in appreciation of Armenian culture and tradition. One of those included traditional Armenian folk dances performed by Image Dance. “It’s really important to keep the culture alive so the Armenian Genocide gets recognized by everyone,” said Kristine Shahverdyan, a member of Image Dance and a junior from Clark.

Students acted out dramatic skits about the genocide and also read classical poems. Juniors Tina Keshishian, Nazan Titizian and Lori Berberian from Clark sang three powerful Armenian songs for the audience: “Der Voghormia,” “Axpers ou yes” and “Hrajeshd Sirelyats”.

The winning genocide remembrance videos from the four schools were viewed as well and closing remarks were made by Board of Education President Greg Krikorian.

“Events like these unite the community and also help with getting the older generations to see what the younger generations are doing in school to show our Armenian traditions and what we stand for,” Grigorian said.

Image Dance group performed two original Armenian folk dances for this year’s annual commemoration. Dance is an art with a lot of cultural background that will help the remembrance of the Armenian Genocide.

Glendale High School’s Armenian Club performed a tabolo— a frozen picture to help the remembrance of the Armenian Genocide. About one thousand people were present for the 14th annual Armenian Genocide Commemoration.